Be inspired with creative lifestyle guru & GP – Emaese Jegede

Posted by Charlotte Leigh on November 09, 2016

I think that doctors enter into medical school as individuals with unique abilities and interests, so why should we abandon what makes us unique once we become doctors?

Meet Dr. Emaese Jegede – one of the inspiring ACW Awards Finalists 2016 in the Diversified Medic of the Year Category for her pursuits beyond conventional medicine. Find out more about her motivations to pursue an alerternative career, how she launched a blog from scratch, and how she’s turned her creative passions into a successful enterprise whilst continuing to work as a GP.


 

Why did you choose to go into medicine?

My mother was a doctor, and as a child I often watched her give informal medical advice to family friends. I was fascinated by how she used her knowledge to help people and I decided that I wanted to do the same. I chose to become a GP because I liked the variety of patients that you could see in a surgery (literally anything could walk through the door) and I’ve always believed in how invaluable primary care is.

emaese1We love the essence of your site MSA Be Inspired! Tell us more about how it came about?

I’ve always been a creative person, so during medical school and GP training I would create abstract paintings in my spare time.

Once I became a GP and had more control over my schedule I began to explore my creative side more by taking courses in interior design, photography, makeup and sewing. Then every week I would usually create something new, like a new makeup look, a new painting or sew a new item of clothing. A friend of mine loved what I created and told me to start a blog.

I resisted the idea at first because I didn’t think anyone would be interested, but when I decided to become a makeup artist I realised that a blog was a great way to advertise my work. I also wanted my blog to inspire people to develop their creativity and to experience the joy that I found in doing so, which is why I chose to showcase my creative skills in photography, arts & crafts and cooking; in addition, I decided to post interviews with a variety of creative entrepreneurs in order to demonstrate that anyone can turn their passions into a business or lifestyle.

I believe that many people never fully reach their true potential for so many reasons; so I hope that the content on my blog helps to liberate such people from whatever holds them back.

I began to create the content for my blog on January 2016 and then I launched it in April 2016. I was so nervous when I launched it, but it is truly one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever done! Whenever someone tells me that my blog inspired them in some way I feel as though my mission has been accomplished and this motivates me to continue.

What skills did you develop whilst running MSA Be Inspired – have they complimented your other work in any way?

I learnt how to build a blog from scratch which for me was a HUGE feat because I’ve never been IT savvy.

I’ve also had to learn basic business skills and how to promote myself.  Interviewing creative entrepreneurs has helped me to develop my communication skills further and this complements my work as a GP, because I “interview” my patients daily in order to extract the information needed to help them.

My skills in makeup, photography and arts and crafts have also grown; while these skills don’t directly transfer over into medicine, they have made me happier as a person which in turn makes me a better doctor. I’m less stressed and able to cope better with the demands of my job.

Congrats on being a finalist in Diversified Medic of the Year! What do you think it means to become a diversified medic?

To me being diversified means firstly looking at yourself as a whole person and identifying what your interests/passions are within medicine and also outside of medicine. Then secondly, creating a career and lifestyle that allows you to pursue all your interests/passions.

My medical career is as important to me as my creative pursuits which is why I’ve built a career to encompass both.

I think that doctors enter into medical school as individuals with unique abilities and interests, so why should we abandon what makes us unique once we become doctors?

I believe it’s important to express our individuality no matter how unconventional it may seem otherwise we run the risk of becoming indistinguishable clones.

emaeseprofileAny advice for doctors exploring avenues off the beaten path?

Firstly, don’t be afraid to be yourself. Initially I worried what people would think of my decision to become a makeup artist, and a blogger alongside medicine. But I realised that if I bowed to the pressure of conformity within the medical profession, I wouldn’t be true to myself as an individual, and over time I would feel stifled and unfulfilled.

Secondly, keep on trying new things and explore the things that you are naturally drawn to – these are clues as to what you should spend your life doing. Thirdly, don’t get to the end of your life and ask, “What if I had pursued my dreams?” I don’t want to have regrets at the end of my life and this is what motivates me to push through the fear that could easily hold me back.

Finally, I think Nike says it best with their slogan: Just do it!

@msabeinspired

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